Agenda and draft minutes

City Council
Monday, 15th January, 2024 2.00 pm

Venue: Council Chamber - at the Council House. View directions

Contact: Jane Garrard, Senior Governance Officer  Email: jane.garrard@nottinghamcity.gov.uk

Items
No. Item

59.

Chair

Minutes:

As Councillor Carole McCulloch, Lord Mayor, was absent, Councillor Shuguftah Quddoos, Sheriff, chaired the meeting.

60.

Order of Business

Minutes:

In accordance with Standing Order 12.17, resolved to amend the order of business for the meeting to move Motion in the name of Councillor Corall Jenkins to become item 3 on the agenda.

61.

Apologies for absence

Minutes:

Councillor Leslie Ayoola – unwell

Councillor Anwar Khan – personal

Councillor Gul Khan - leave

Councillor Carole McCulloch – personal

Councillor Salma Mumtaz – unwell

Councillor Devontay Okure - unwell

62.

Declarations of interests

Minutes:

In relation to agenda item 11 Motion in the name of Councillor Corall Jenkins (minute reference 61), in the interests of transparency Councillor Adele Williams stated that she worked for a climate charity - Hope for the Future.

 

63.

Motion in the name of Councillor Corall Jenkins

This Council recognises that we have a vital part to play in ocean recovery.  The people of Nottingham City benefit from our ocean through the air we breathe, the food we eat, and the way our ocean regulates our climate. We also impact the ocean through what we put down our drains, the litter and pollution that flows into our rivers, and the carbon emissions we produce.  The burden of taking care of our ocean often falls to communities at the coast; but they are at the end of the line, receiving pollution and problems from inland communities like ours. We know that many of our citizens are concerned about the future of our oceans.  Nottingham City Council recognises that we have a vital role to play in recovering the health of our ocean through increasing awareness of how local actions can affect the ocean and by acting as responsible custodians of the rivers, streams and waterways that run through our city on their way to the sea.

 

This Council pledges to report to Full Council within [6-12] months on the actions taken as follows:

  1. Grow awareness in Nottingham of how all people, wherever they live, impact and are impacted by ocean health; working with children and residents of all ages to embed understanding of the ‘source to sea’ approach, stopping pollution at source and enabling as many people as people to get involved with river protection activities.
  2. Write to the Government asking them to:

a)  To put the ocean into net recovery by 2030, updating the Marine Policy Statement and produce a national Ocean Recovery Strategy which recognises the connection between river and ocean systems and enables their recovery rather than managing degraded or altered habitats.

b)  Stop plastic pollution at source by strengthening the regulations around single-use plastics and set standards for microfibre-catching filters to ensure that all new washing machines are fitted with a filter that captures a high percentage of microfibres produced in the wash cycle by 2025.

c)  To make our rivers a clean and healthy resource for our citizens to enjoy, by taking swift action to reduce the risk of sewage storm overflow discharges into our rivers and bathing waters, bringing the target dates forward, to achieve 80% reduction by 2035 and reverse the cuts to Environment Agency funding so that they can take appropriate enforcement action against polluters.

 

Minutes:

Councillor Corall Jenkins moved the following motion, which was seconded by Councillor Zafran Khan:

 

This Council recognises that we have a vital part to play in ocean recovery.  The people of Nottingham City benefit from our ocean through the air we breathe, the food we eat, and the way our ocean regulates our climate. We also impact the ocean through what we put down our drains, the litter and pollution that flows into our rivers, and the carbon emissions we produce.  The burden of taking care of our ocean often falls to communities at the coast; but they are at the end of the line, receiving pollution and problems from inland communities like ours. We know that many of our citizens are concerned about the future of our oceans.  Nottingham City Council recognises that we have a vital role to play in recovering the health of our ocean through increasing awareness of how local actions can affect the ocean and by acting as responsible custodians of the rivers, streams and waterways that run through our city on their way to the sea.

 

This Council pledges to report to Full Council within [6-12] months on the actions taken as follows:

  1. Grow awareness in Nottingham of how all people, wherever they live, impact and are impacted by ocean health; working with children and residents of all ages to embed understanding of the ‘source to sea’ approach, stopping pollution at source and enabling as many people as people to get involved with river protection activities.
  2. Write to the Government asking them to:

a)  To put the ocean into net recovery by 2030, updating the Marine Policy Statement and produce a national Ocean Recovery Strategy which recognises the connection between river and ocean systems and enables their recovery rather than managing degraded or altered habitats.

b)  Stop plastic pollution at source by strengthening the regulations around single-use plastics and set standards for microfibre-catching filters to ensure that all new washing machines are fitted with a filter that captures a high percentage of microfibres produced in the wash cycle by 2025.

c)  To make our rivers a clean and healthy resource for our citizens to enjoy, by taking swift action to reduce the risk of sewage storm overflow discharges into our rivers and bathing waters, bringing the target dates forward, to achieve 80% reduction by 2035 and reverse the cuts to Environment Agency funding so that they can take appropriate enforcement action against polluters.

Councillor Sam Lux proposed the following amendment to the motion, which was seconded by Councillor Sam Harris.

 

Insert the following actions:

 

1.  “Recognise the importance of the protection and recovery of the River Trent and its tributaries in all decision making by Nottingham City Council, especially regarding planning, regeneration and economic policy.  Decisions taken by the Council should be mindful of the need to mitigate the impact of the climate and ecological emergencies and to acknowledge the various nature-based solutions in our journey towards a carbon neutral and climate resilient future.”  ...  view the full minutes text for item 63.

64.

Questions from citizens pdf icon PDF 5 KB

Minutes:

Council Contribution to the Cultural Sector

A citizen asked the following question of the Portfolio Holder for Leisure and Culture: What detailed assessment has the Council conducted of the potential impact of the proposed ending of contributions to the cultural sector, particularly in relation to the potential limitations it may impose on the career aspirations of young people and the overall economic and cultural well-being of our community?

 

Councillor Pavlos Kotsonis replied as follows:

Thank you.  This relates to a proposal for the ending of grant contributions to the cultural sector. At present, the proposal to end all such annual awards, a sum of £190,000 for 2023-2024, is out for consultation. This will enable us to better understand the impact and allow affected organisations to submit relevant information to us. The consultation will therefore inform councillors when they do need to take budget reduction decisions later this year to ensure that they are fully aware and appraised of the consequences.  We are conscious that while Nottingham City Council’s annual grant contribution may not seem large, this funding does enable many of the cultural organisations in our city to lever additional funds from Arts Council England and other trusts and societies.  Nottingham is a city with a rich, diverse and uniquely vibrant culture on offer. The city is home to many creative professionals that have a thriving community of both professional and amateur-led organisations and societies which make a strong contribution to Nottingham as a place where people want to visit, live, and study.  We know that in just the last financial year the work of the 14 national portfolio organisations funded and supported by Arts Council England in our city alone generated over 1.9 million visits from and across the UK into Nottingham, generating millions of pounds for the city’s economy. The City Council, over and above the annual grants, also directly manages and delivers Council services of its own. We employ hundreds of people in a number of services, including the Theatre Royal and Concert Hall, events delivery, museum and gallery service, and of course our libraries throughout the city. We are therefore very aware of the role and importance that cultural provision plays within the city’s wider economy, and the opportunities it offers to many young people who want to enter the arts sector.  This is quite a difficult sector in terms of the security of employment and so on and so forth, and so offering entry to those sectors is very important.

 

Unfortunately, the city is facing a budget crisis that will lead us to take difficult decisions down the line. But it is important to add that the state of Nottingham City Council’s finances and its £53 million budget gap is, in the majority, a product of a broken system of local government funding. We are in a situation whereby 1 in 5 councils in the UK are on the brink of financial meltdown. Nottingham City Council’s budget gap is mostly made out of pressures in  ...  view the full minutes text for item 64.

65.

Petitions from Councillors on behalf of citizens

Minutes:

Councillor Andrew Rule presented a petition on behalf of citizens opposing the decision by Extracare to remove the ATM cash machine from Lark Hill Village, Clifton Estate and the safety concerns posed by the cash machines on Nobel Road.  The petitioners consider that the decision will have a hugely detrimental impact on the Village and call on the Portfolio Holder for Adult Social Care and Health to join the residents of Lark Hill in lobbying Extracare to reverse the decision.

 

Councillor Andrew Rule presented a petition on behalf of citizens calling on the Portfolio Holder with responsibility for highways, the Portfolio Holder with responsibility for the environment and the Corporate Director for Communities, Environment and Resident Services to create a working group with their equivalents in Nottinghamshire County Council, Tramlink and Severn Trent Water to look at how this can be alleviated going forward and specifically address the following issues:

a)  Why the drainage network from the junction of Ruddington Lane to the Wilford Lane tram crossing appears more susceptible to overflow, whilst the network on the opposite side of the road/ tram line does not appear to do the same.

b)  What can be done to increase the capacity of the drainage system under the Wilford Lane tram stop which has experienced an increased number of flooding incidents in recent months resulting in service cancellations causing disruption to service users, particularly commuters and school children.

c)  The impact of the recent Aldi and Lidl developments within Rushcliffe and how water run-off from those sites impact drainage capacity, together with any consequential effects this has on the carriageway, the tramline and properties in Roland Avenue, Maplestead Avenue and the allotments.

d)  The potential health risks to the general public with expose to sewage.

He outlined that, following Storm Bebet and Storm Henk, Wilford Lane has experienced increasing instances where carriageway run-off has led to flooding in residents’ gardens, and in the most serious cases this has prevented elderly residents from leaving their properties; and as a result of the flooding residents are likely to face financial loss as a result of increased insurance premiums.

 

 

66.

To confirm the minutes of the Ordinary Council meeting held on 13 November 2023 pdf icon PDF 698 KB

Minutes:

The minutes of the Ordinary Council meeting held on 13 November 2023 were confirmed as an accurate record and signed by the Chair.

67.

To confirm the Minutes of the Extraordinary Council meeting held on 13 November 2023 pdf icon PDF 95 KB

Minutes:

The minutes of the Extraordinary Council meeting held on 13 November 2023 were confirmed as an accurate record and signed by the Chair.

68.

To confirm the Minutes of the Extraordinary Council meeting held on 7 December 2023 pdf icon PDF 97 KB

Minutes:

The minutes of the Extraordinary Council meeting held on 7 December 2023 were confirmed as an accurate record and signed by the Chair.

69.

To confirm the Minutes of the Extraordinary Council meeting held on 18 December 2023 pdf icon PDF 293 KB

Minutes:

The minutes of the Extraordinary Council meeting held on 18 December 2023 were confirmed as an accurate record and signed by the Chair.

70.

To receive official communications and announcements from the Leader of the Council and/or the Chief Executive

Minutes:

The Chief Executive made the following announcements:

 

I am pleased to report that Nottingham was very well represented in the New Year’s Honours list, and I’d like to warmly congratulate all of the recipients.  Recognised this year was Eunice Campbell-Clark, who served as councillor in the city and county for 34 years and was recently made an Honorary Alderwoman of Nottingham City Council. Eunice has been awarded an OBE for services to local government.  A former City Council colleague, Jacquie Blake, was also honoured with an OBE for services to education. Jacquie retired in May 2022 after working for the Council for 32 years in Education Catering.  Elsewhere, off the back of being named BBC Sports Personality of the Year, England goalkeeper Mary Earps – who grew up in Nottingham – has been awarded an MBE for services to football, while Nottinghamshire and England’s Stuart Broad, who was already an MBE, has been awarded a CBE for services to cricket.  Also honoured is University of Nottingham’s Professor Matthew Brookes who has received an OBE for his pioneering work on brain imaging, helping to create a new kind of wearable brain scanner. Plus, 74-year-old Ethel Gloria Anderson has been awarded an MBE for her outstanding service to the community of St Ann’s.  Former Nottingham Forest and England footballing legend Peter Shilton was given a CBE in recognition of his work to prevent harm from gambling, while Ellie and Becky Downie, the champion gymnast sisters who both represented Great Britain at the Olympics, have been given MBEs for services to the sport.  Well done to all. We’re extremely proud of you, and your connection to our city.

 

I am sad to report the death of former colleague Dave Pickering. Having joined the Council in 1984, Dave worked for the Council for over 22 years including as Head of the Direct Labour Organisation for Housing.  Our thoughts are with his family, friends and all those affected by his passing.

 

Councillor David Mellen congratulated former councillor, and Honorary Alderwoman Eunice Campbell-Clark on the receipt of an OBE for services to local government.

 

Councillor Michael Edwards spoke in tribute to Dave Pickering and a minute’s silence was held.

71.

Questions from Councillors - to the City Council's lead Councillor on the Nottinghamshire and City of Nottingham Fire and Rescue Authority

Minutes:

None

72.

Questions from Councillors - to a member of Executive Board, the Chair of a Committee and the Chair of any other City Council body pdf icon PDF 116 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Central Library

Councillor Michael Savage asked the following question of the Portfolio Holder for Leisure and Culture:

Will the Portfolio Holder for Leisure and Culture join me in celebrating the opening of the new Central Library last year, and can he confirm how many visitors have been since it opened?

 

Councillor Pavlos Kotsonis replied as follows:

Thank you Sheriff, and thanks to Councillor Savage for his question.  Can I start with a huge thanks to our officers and staff, and also to our partners who worked so hard to help us open this great facility for Nottingham. I’m glad to report that our Libraries and Museums Team continues to deliver for our city.  Even working under really adverse financial conditions, we worked to reopen Nottingham Castle with a new and improved offer for the benefit of Nottingham residents, and that same team also delivered on the fit-out and opening of the new Central Library last year. It is that same Team that is also involved with works linked with the reopening of the new Sherwood Library, the fit-out of which will be starting very soon. It shows the resilience of our leadership, delivering for the benefit of Nottingham citizens in times of great adversity, and it also showcases the competence and the love for our city vested in our staff who continue championing and developing our public spaces.

 

It was such a great pleasure to see the Central Library opening as planned on the 28 November with the help of pupils from the Sneinton Church of England Primary School, pupils from Victoria Primary School, and pupils from Mellers Primary School.  The library is really an offering to future generations of people, and will help boost educational outcomes for young people, improve employability and drive economic development. The Central Library is as popular as we expected and more. It was really impressive for me to hear that for the first 32 days it was open it received over 28,000 visits. We had over 16,000 books borrowed from our collection and over 3,000 hours of our computers being used by over 1,000 visitors. We have had a number of external bookings for our rooms, which are indeed very popular with organisations now, and we have received very positive comments about the coffee shop, which is a service extension of our very own in-house operator, who operates the Museum and Galleries Service coffee shops, such as the one in Newstead Abbey and the one in the Castle. Over 2,700 people got a new library card, and we have delivered over 95 events to date. We hosted our first ‘Sound at Central’ Music Event, which was sold out. We arranged a Community Christmas Lights Switch-On which was also sold out. We have already had conversation groups, craft and Lego clubs, as well as a number of flash mob events with the Robin Hood Youth Orchestra.

The library was launched including an exhibition which constitutes a collage of photographs and narrative of memories showcasing  ...  view the full minutes text for item 72.

73.

Decisions taken under Urgency Procedures pdf icon PDF 211 KB

Report of the Leader of the Council

Minutes:

Councillor David Mellen, Leader of the Council, presented the report informing Council that since the last report to Council no decisions had been taken under the urgency provisions within the Overview and Scrutiny Procedure Rules (Article 11) or the Access to Information Procedure Rules (Article 13) of the Constitution.  The report was seconded by Councillor Audra Wynter.

 

The report was noted.

74.

Polling District & Places Review 2023 pdf icon PDF 159 KB

Report of the (Acting) Returning Officer

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Audra Wynter, Portfolio Holder for Finance and HR, presented the report of the (Acting) Returning Officer setting out proposed changes to polling districts and places, following a review carried out in accordance with the requirements of the Representation of the People Act 1983 and the Review of Polling Districts and Polling Places (Parliamentary Elections) Regulations 2006.  The reasons for each of the proposed changes was set out in the report.  The report was seconded by Councillor David Mellen.

 

Councillors debated the report.

 

Resolved to approve the amendments to the Council’s scheme of polling districts and places as set out in Appendix 2 and Appendix 3 to the report for the reasons in each case set out in those appendices.

75.

Committee Membership Changes

To note that Councillor Graham Chapman has resigned as a member of the Audit Committee.

Minutes:

It was noted that Councillor Graham Chapman had resigned as a member of the Audit Committee.