Agenda and draft minutes

City Council
Monday, 8th July, 2019 2.00 pm

Venue: Council House, Old Market Square

Contact: Jane Garrard, Senior Governance Officer  Email: jane.garrard@nottinghamcity.gov.uk

Items
No. Item

18.

Apologies for absence

Minutes:

Councillor Leslie Ayoola – personal

Councillor Dave Liversidge - unwell

19.

Declarations of interests

Minutes:

Councillors Cheryl Barnard, Azad Choudhry, Kevin Clarke, Sam Gardiner, Jawaid Khalil, Gul Nawaz Khan, Neghat Nawaz Khan, Jane Lakey and Audra Wynter declared an interest in Agenda Item 12 ‘Motion in the name of Councillor Linda Woodings’ as they are landlords of private rental properties.  They left the room during consideration of, and voting on this Item.

20.

To note the appointment of the Lord Mayor's Chaplain

Minutes:

The appointment of Rabbi Tanya Sakhnovich as the Lord Mayor’s Chaplain for 2019/20 was noted.

21.

Questions from citizens pdf icon PDF 110 KB

Minutes:

Mundella Building, Green Street

 

JH asked the following question of the Leader of the Council:

 

The Mundella Building, Green Street was sold to Blueprint for £70,164.  Why was there no public consultation about the future and sale of this fine educational facility, built on land sold to the Council by Jesse Boot expressly for educational purposes?  Could they not come to some arrangement to hand this beautifully proportioned educational building back into public/community ownership, for example, training, education, crafts, cultural events, a community kitchen and a cafe, with al fresco dining in its outdoor courtyard? Is there enough good will amongst this new Council and their partners for this building to be developed into a useful community asset serving the many, not the few, serving thousands of people, rather than be turned into 10 luxury apartments?  If there is now appetite within this new Council to retain the building for the citizens of Nottingham, will the profits (from what may well be in excess of a £2million development) be ploughed into the 3 local schools?

 

Councillor David Mellen replied as follows:

 

Thank you Lord Mayor, and can I thank the citizen for the question.  The vacant Mundella Centre was transferred from Nottinghamshire County Council to Nottingham City Council in 2011.  When the property was transferred its potential reuse for educational purposes was considered but not progressed and the building has subsequently stood vacant for a number of years.  During this time the building has been subject to vandalism and we have incurred costs related to holding the vacant building.  We undertook extensive discussions and negotiations with a local organisation that had expressed an interest in reusing the building but the costs of the refurbishment were prohibitive and it withdrew its interest.  No community group has approached the Council during this time with a view to its reuse.  To support the regeneration plans for the Meadows we decided to sell the site to Blueprint at best consideration rather than leave it vacant any longer.  The price paid takes into account the condition of the building, layout and location.  The Council supports the conversion of such buildings rather than demolition and the costs of refurbishing such an old building are significant. 

 

Investment has been made over the past decade into schools in the Meadows.  At Wellbeck Primary a consultation approved the increase in numbers of pupils in the school from 210 to 315.  This required the demolition of the Trent Family Centre next door to create more space for the school and a new build.  It cost about £800,000.  The conditions works at the school have required around a further £200,000 of investment.  At Victoria Primary, previously Riverside Primary, the expansion works in 2013/14 included a new hall and six new classes taking the school from a 210 place to a 420 place.  The cost was about £1.1million.  This included condition works to improve drainage at the site.  Greenfields Primary School, one of six schools in the City to benefit from the  ...  view the full minutes text for item 21.

22.

Petitions from Councillors on behalf of citizens

Minutes:

Councillor Cheryl Barnard submitted a petition on behalf of residents of Bulwell Forest requesting that no funfairs and events including loud music and noise are held on the Bulwell Forest Recreation Ground.

23.

To confirm the minutes of the last meeting of Council held on 20 May 2019 pdf icon PDF 589 KB

Minutes:

The minutes of the meeting held on 20 May 2019 were agreed as an accurate record and signed by the Chair.

24.

To receive official communications and announcements from the Leader of the Council and/or the Chief Executive

Minutes:

Alison Michalska, Deputy Chief Executive, reported the following:

 

Queen’s Birthday Honours 2019

I would like to congratulate all those who live or work in Nottingham who were awarded an honour in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List 2019, including Professor Harminder Singh Dua awarded a CBE for services to eye healthcare, health education and ophthalmology; Gillian Bainbridge awarded a BEM for services to tenants of the Aspley and Bells Lane Tenants and Residents Association; Melanie Leng awarded an MBE for services to environmental research; Rebecca Meredith awarded a CBE for services to education; and Skinder Hundal awarded an MBE for contribution to visual arts.

 

Former Councillor Tony Marshall

It is with sadness that I report the death of former Councillor Tony Marshall on 15 June 2019.  He was first elected to represent the Arboretum ward in May 2003, and continued to do so until May 2011.

 

Councillor Merlita Bryan spoke in tribute to former Councillor Tony Marshall and a minute’s silence was held.

 

 

25.

Questions from Councillors - to the City Council's lead Councillor on the Nottinghamshire and City of Nottingham Fire and Rescue Authority

Minutes:

None

26.

Questions from Councillors - to a member of Executive Board, the Chair of a Committee and the Chair of any other City Council body pdf icon PDF 120 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Homelessness

 

Councillor Maria Watson asked the following question of the Portfolio Holder for Housing, Planning and Heritage:

 

Could the Portfolio Holder outline, to the best of her knowledge, the most recently recorded number of homeless people living within the City?

 

Councillor Linda Woodings replied as follows:

 

Thank you Lord Mayor and thank you Councillor Watson for your question.  As you are no doubt aware homelessness is national crisis caused by the impact of Government austerity, welfare reform and a broken housing market.  In Nottingham, despite our substantial efforts, homelessness case management records show that there are a total of 698 households who are homeless in the City.  465 are under the main homelessness relief duty, 165 are owed the main homelessness duties and a decision on main duty is pending for 68 households.  In addition, there are also 266 households currently under the homelessness prevention duty who are not currently homeless but threatened with homelessness anticipated to occur within the next 56 days.  It is at this point that I really do pay tribute to the NPRAS Team, the Nottingham private rented assistance scheme, who last year assisted 331 households before they became homeless. 

 

I do appreciate that many citizens conflate homelessness with people who present as homeless and rough sleeping in the city centre.  So I do repeatedly receive regular assurances in Nottingham, just in case there is any confusion, that we have our ‘no first night out’ policy and it gives me the confidence to say that those people who present as rough sleeping in the City either have, or have been offered accommodation.  Our latest rough sleeper count in June, which is conducted every month by the City’s Street Outreach Team, showed 48 people sleeping rough and that was a fall of 5 on the count for May. 

 

How we are addressing this is by our ambitious programme of affordable council housing development which will help provide accommodation at a cost and standard that provides our residents with a decent home.  Over the last four years we have built 2293 affordable homes with more than 500 in the pipeline as of May. We intend to build or buy 1000 more council homes for rent and facilitate the building of 4000 homes across the City.  We also, within our manifesto, say that we will protect our benefits and welfare advice services for citizens in order that they do not get into debt.  We are obviously campaigning to scrap the ‘right to buy’ but in the interim, whilst we have the current Government, we are campaigning to limit ‘right to buy’ to at least give us a moratorium period on ‘right to buy’ of new builds in order that we can recover our build costs.  We set aside £9million to address homelessness in the City, making possible the purchase of 130 homes for use as temporary accommodation.  We have additional staffing in our NPRAS Team.  It has doubled in size now to support people to avoid them become homeless  ...  view the full minutes text for item 26.

27.

Overview and Scrutiny Annual Report 2018/19 pdf icon PDF 112 KB

Report of the Chair of the Overview and Scrutiny Committee

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Anne Peach, Chair of the Overview and Scrutiny Committee, submitted the Overview and Scrutiny Annual Report detailing the work of the scrutiny committees during 2018/19.

 

RESOLVED to accept the Overview and Scrutiny Annual Report 2018/19.

28.

Decisions taken under urgency procedures pdf icon PDF 205 KB

Report of the Leader of the Council

Minutes:

Councillor David Mellen, Leader of the Council, submitted a report detailing decisions taken under procedures that include exemption from Overview and Scrutiny Call In Procedure Rules and Special Urgency Access to Information Rules.

 

RESOLVED to note

 

(1)  that there were no urgent decisions (exempt from call in) to be reported; and

 

(2)  the Key Decision taken under special urgency procedures:

 

Decision Reference Number

Date of Decision

Subject

Value of Decision

Reason for Special Urgency

3524

9 May 2019

Transfer of D2N2 Accountable Body status for Growing Places Fund and Enterprise Zones to Derbyshire County Council

£15,000,000

The Accountable Body status needed to be transferred in a timely manner

 

29.

Motion

Motion in the name of Councillor Linda Woodings:

 

This Council welcomes the government consultation to revoke Section 21 of the Housing Act 1988 that allows private landlords to evict tenants without reason. 

The threat of a no-fault eviction causes insecurity and stress for Nottingham households who rent privately, and in particular it penalises the children of such households who miss out on the wealth of benefits that secure housing delivers for their development and life chances.

Consequently this Council welcomes the action taken by the Scottish Government to restrict no-fault evictions. It further resolves to back the campaign to abolish Section 21 of the Housing Act 1988 by lobbying the government and by submitting evidence to the formal consultation in support of this change in the law.

 

Minutes:

Moved by Councillor Linda Woodings, seconded by Councillor Nick Raine:

This Council welcomes the Government consultation to revoke Section 21 of the Housing Act 1988 that allows private landlords to evict tenants without reason. 

The threat of a no-fault eviction causes insecurity and stress for Nottingham households who rent privately, and in particular it penalises the children of such households who miss out on the wealth of benefits that secure housing delivers for their development and life chances.

Consequently this Council welcomes the action taken by the Scottish Government to restrict no-fault evictions. It further resolves to back the campaign to abolish Section 21 of the Housing Act 1988 by lobbying the Government and by submitting evidence to the formal consultation in support of this change in the law.

RESOLVED to carry the motion.

30.

Motion

Motion in the name of Councillor Kevin Clarke:

 

The month of June is traditionally recognised as LGBT+ Pride Month and on July 27th Nottingham will host its annual Nottinghamshire Pride event seeing thousands gather in the City Centre for a day-long celebration that includes a colourful parade around our city.

 

At a time when hate crimes directed at the LGBT+ community are on the increase nationally, (rising by 144% per capita since 2013/14 – with just under half of these being violent attacks) and with homophobic leaflets being distributed to Nottingham residents over the past month, it is important now more than ever that Nottingham City Council stands in solidarity with the LGBT+ community.

 

The Full Council meeting held on 20th May 2019 saw the adoption of the Labour Manifesto as the basis for Council policy until 2023. Whilst this document rightly celebrated the diversity of our City, it omitted to provide express support for Nottingham’s wider LGBT+ community and the challenges that they face. 

 

This Council resolves to:

·  support Nottingham’s LGBT+ community in the battle against hate and intolerance, by providing a strong and united voice against homophobia;

·  ensure that the Council provides the LGBT+ community with facilities at a local level, enabling people to receive support where they need it;

·  condemn recent protests held across the country that opposed the introduction of inclusive education programmes within schools, designed to teach equality;

·  provide support to Nottingham schools that teach the inclusive education programme and work with them to ensure that this can be done in a safe and supporting environment free from the threat of intolerance.

 

Minutes:

Motion proposed by Councillor Kevin Clarke, seconded by Councillor Maria Watson:

 

The month of June is traditionally recognised as LGBT+ Pride Month and on 27 July Nottingham will host its annual Nottinghamshire Pride event seeing thousands gather in the City Centre for a day-long celebration that includes a colourful parade around our City.

At a time when hate crimes directed at the LGBT+ community are on the increase nationally, (rising by 144% per capita since 2013-14 – with just under half of these being violent attacks) and with homophobic leaflets being distributed to Nottingham residents over the past month, it is important now more than ever that Nottingham City Council stands in solidarity with the LGBT+ community.

The Full Council meeting held on 20 May 2019 saw the adoption of the Labour Manifesto as the basis for Council policy until 2023. Whilst this document rightly celebrated the diversity of our City, it omitted to provide express support for Nottingham’s wider LGBT+ community and the challenges that they face. 


This Council resolves to:

·  support Nottingham’s LGBT+ community in the battle against hate and intolerance, by providing a strong and united voice against homophobia;

·  ensure that the Council provides the LGBT+ community with facilities at a local level, enabling people to receive support where they need it;

·  condemn recent protests held across the country that opposed the introduction of inclusive education programmes within schools, designed to teach equality;

·  provide support to Nottingham schools that teach the inclusive education programme and work with them to ensure that this can be done in a safe and supporting environment free from the threat of intolerance.

The following amendment was moved by Councillor Angharad Roberts and seconded by Councillor Rebecca Langton:

 

(text struck through deleted and text in italics added)

 

The month of June is traditionally recognised as LGBT+ Pride Month and on 27 July Nottingham will host its annual Nottinghamshire Pride event seeing thousands gather in the City Centre for a day long celebration that includes a colourful parade around our City.

 

On 27 July we once again welcome Notts Pride Parade to Nottingham.  It is its 10th anniversary and this year the parade will be led by under-represented groups from the BAME community.  Pride shows us that a community can decide to fight for its future.

 

At a time when hate crimes directed at the LGBT+ community are on an increase nationally, (rising by 144% per capita since 2013/14 – with just under half of those being violent attacks) and more recently and more locally, with homophobic leaflets being distributed to Nottingham residents over the past month, it is important now more than ever that Nottingham City Council stands recommits to standing in solidarity with the LGBT+ community.

 

The Full Council meeting held on 20 May 2019 saw the adoption of the Labour Manifesto as the basis for Council policy until 2023.  Whilst this document rightly celebrated the diversity of our City, it omitted to provide express support for Nottingham’s  ...  view the full minutes text for item 30.

31.

Membership Changes

To note that:

·  Councillor Andrew Rule has been appointed to replace Councillor Kirsty Jones as a member of the Trusts and Charities Committee

·  Councillor Roger Steel has been appointed as a substitute member of the Trusts and Charities Committee

 

Minutes:

The following committee membership changes were noted:

 

(1)  Councillor Andrew Rule has been appointed to replace Councillor Kirsty Jones as a member of the Trusts and Charities Committee; and

 

(2)  Councillor Roger Steel has been appointed as a substitute member of the Trusts and Charities Committee.